Aside

PhB: Doctor of Baking

For most people who come into a PhD after taking a number of detours, that acceptance letter feels like a dream. You’re side-hustle, hobby and passion becomes a career.

This is an awesome feeling, it is a real sense of purpose and serenity, a sense that is sustained even in the midst of fits of self-doubt and frustration. But… when your hobby becomes your career that consumes your every waking moment, you’ve lost something too.

Hobbies are important. Leisure is essential to who we are as human beings. The more intellectual, abstract and pressured you’re day job is, the more you need a hobby that consists of manual labour, that uses your body and hands and generates a simple, tangible result.

This hobby also needs to be disconnected, i.e. non-involved in screens. This is not to say leisure cannot be found in things like video games or reading a novel on kindle, but for someone who reads and writes all day (mostly onscreen) my eyes and my mind need a break from the stimulation of the screen.

I’ve always loved being outside and gardening, but I live in an apartment with one small window box, so that is something that I will have to explore later down the track. What I have also been fascinated by is baking, especially bread.

Now that my hobby has become my career, I have instinctively begun exploring the art of baking bread. Baking is working really well for me because it is physical, it produces tangible results that I can eat, but it also requires being left alone.

The fact that I need to leave my dough to rise, means that, yes I can procrastinate by baking but, only for a little while. I have something to occupy my attention while my brain digests some reading. And then I need to let the yeast do its work and so I return to my work. I can fit it in around my reading and writing and it is something productive to do when my brain can’t take anymore.

As in life, my baking doesn’t always turn out the way I want it, but it is a different kind of learning, a different kind of creativity and reminds me that a PhD is a process and as abstract as it seems now, it will produce. In the mean time, I have bread to eat.

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The Latest Casualty in the Generational War: Smashed Avo

For those who are outside the Australian Eastern Seaboard media sphere, demography commentator Bernard Salt argued that if Millennials stopped spending money on overpriced avocado mashed up on toast in cafes, they would be able to afford to by a home in the overheated capital city real estate market.

Desperate for ANY story not related to the worst American Election in history, the article has been jumped on by outraged avo lovers, slightly irked economists and bemused bloggers and has blown into a proper, teacup-sized tempest that has filled my Facebook feed with pictures of said smashed avo on toast.

I’m going to add to the cohort of bemused bloggers because, 1) I have a PhD to procrastinate from and 2) I feel like I have a unique perspective to add to this debate.

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